I wonder if you know how it’s like to go to the supermarket during a pandemic. Although today was Saturdays, I was expecting to see a rather low flow of people in the supermarket. But that wasn’t the case.

It was and it felt like a normal Saturday, when it’s time to go and buy groceries. Some were wearing facial masks and gloves, while others weren’t. I was part of the second group.

To put an end to all the panic that’s being spread on social media about how we are going to starve to death… The supermarket had everything in stock, just like it always has. Indeed, I have to admit that some products seemed to have gotten more expensive. The one that shocked me was the antibacterial hand sanitizer.. 50ml for 11.50 ron (~2.4 Eur). That’s outrageous. Good thing the stocks of soup were available. Bought 6.

The reality of the pandemic is kinda quiet. Not much is going on. The streets are mostly empty (which must be a dream for anyone still having to go to work or go places, or the delivery people).

Living through a pandemic is a weird thing

I beleive that it’s in our nature to always prepare for something and to see results after any kind of challenge. But a pandemic doesn’t act like that. The enemy is invisible and it’s nothing to expect or see happening. It’s a game of patience, and your enemy has all the time in the world. We don’t.

I think that’s what is scaring us. The irreversible pass of time.

I’m not saying we shouldn’t help each other or that we should go out on the streets like nothing is happening. But we aren’t creatures to think too much of the future. We made it so far because the human race always chose the option which delivers immediate results. In this case, a lot of YOLO.

How did my life change during the past month?

I would be tempted to say not so much, but when I think a bit harder, I can see some differences.

One month ago, I had just got back from Malta, where I want to move in the nearby feature (but I can’t really tell if that’s going to happen anytime soon). It was my second time in Malta, in a span of 5 weeks. That’s how much we (me and boyfriend) loved it there.

Then I attended a social media conference, with a couple of hundred people. Comparing to the current state of things (casual gatherings or more than 3 people aren’t allowed), I can definitely feel the difference.

I have no job. This is good and bad. I was working from home anyway, so not a lot has changed. All the hours I was spending working, I now used to work on my blog and videos. I feel the same, spending most of my time at home, with my dog. But there is a stressing thought, somewhere back in my head, that annoys me. That’s because it keeps reminding me I can’t really get out and walk around, go to a park or anywhere else. I feel forced to spend a lot more indoors. And nobody likes to feel forced in any way.

All restaurants, shops, bars, gyms, and non-essential businesses, are closed. I wasn’t going out much to begin with, so it doesn’t really bother me. And if you want to eat restaurant food, you can always order, because more places still do deliveries.

I’m talking more with my friends on social media and via video calls.

I’m starting to think about when it will all end

And the answer is seems to be longer than a couple of months. I am trying to imagine how bad the financial crisis will get. And I hope that this will be an overall reset for business, people and the world in general.

All of a sudden, I am so much more grateful for all the travelling experience I had in the past few years. And as much as I treasure all of my travel experiences, I value my past volunteer projects, the most. I am a better and happier human because of those experiences. and that’s why I can’t be anything but grateful.

Iulia Vasile

Iulia is a traveller and her obsession started in her teenage years. Her aim is to discover as much as possible from this world and to inspire others to do the same! The ultimate tool for self-improvement and personal growth is travelling and this is what she discovered after years of depression. Now she shares her stories here. Describing experiences for others who might need them.

2 Comments

  1. I’m not seeing a huge difference either but it is strange having to queue to get into a supermarket, but once inside I feel like a VIP as there are so few people allowed inside at one time! No price hikes here though, petrol has become much cheaper but during a lockdown that’s like giving a bald person free hair clippers…

Tell me what you think!

%d bloggers like this: